Seattle Photographer Daniel Sheehan's Photo Blog

space photography

Cassini Views of Saturn at Equinox

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There are some fabulous new images of our neighbor Saturn and its fascinating rings and moons. Cassini Equinox Mission Website. These photos were among 23 imahes featured on The Big Picture.

“Checking in with NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, our current emissary to Saturn, some 1.5 billion kilometers (932 million miles) distant from Earth, we find it recently gathering images of the Saturnian system at equinox. During the equinox, the sunlight casts long shadows across Saturn’s rings, highlighting previously known phenomena and revealing a few never-before seen images. Cassini continues to orbit Saturn, part of its extended Equinox Mission, funded through through September 2010. A proposal for a further extension is under consideration, one that would keep Cassini in orbit until 2017, ending with a spectacular series of orbits inside the rings followed by a suicide plunge into Saturn on Sept. 15, 2017.

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Read all about the Cassini Spacecraft Mission and see the other (tax payer funded NASA) space photos at The Big Picture The Boston Globe’s photo blog.. Seattle Photographer Daniel Sheehan specializes in photojournalism, portraits and photography for publications and corporations, and photojournalistic Seattle wedding photography.

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Photographs of Saturn from Cassini

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I just had to post some of these images I have been looking at on the nasa website. There are some fabulous images of our neighbor Saturn and its fascinating rings and moons.

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Read all about the Cassini Spacecraft Mission and see more (tax payer funded NASA) space  photos at Cassini Equinox Mission Website.  Seattle Photographer Daniel Sheehan specializes in photojournalism, portraits and photography for publications and corporations, and photojournalistic Seattle wedding photography.


Hubble – Newest Space Photographs

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Astronomers have declared NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope a fully rejuvenated observatory with the release of observations from four of its six operating science instruments. Sen. Barbara Mikulski of Maryland unveiled the images Weds 9 Sept 09 at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC.

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“This marks a new beginning for Hubble,” said Ed Weiler, associate administrator for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate. “The telescope was given an extreme makeover and now is significantly more powerful than ever, well equipped to last into the next decade.”Topping the list of new views are colorful, multi-wavelength pictures of far-flung galaxies, a densely packed star cluster, an eerie “pillar of creation,” and a “butterfly” nebula…continue reading and see more photos at NASA.gov. Seattle Photographer Daniel Sheehan specializes in photojournalism, portraits and photography for publications and corporations, and photojournalistic Seattle wedding photography.


Man on the Moon Apollo 11

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NASA’s LRO Spacecraft Gets its First Look at Apollo Landing Sites
This photograph shows the first imagery of the Apollo 11 lunar landing site taken in 40 years. The picture is one of many photos taken by NASA’a Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter . and posted on their website. I find it so interesting I had to post it here. Can you believe Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin left their lunar vehicle parked on the moon for 40 years and no one took it? Actually it was their lunar module descent stage that was left. On the NASA website they have photos of the landing sites of Apollo 11, 14, 15, 16, 17. Check it out. Below is a shot taken by Neil Armstrong of Buzz Aldrin in front of the lunar module

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Man On the Moon – 40 years ago.

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Apollo 11 Revisited Above, view from Apollo 11 command vehicle “Columbia” of the moon with the earth rising on the horizon.

I find it hard to believe that it is 40 years ago since we first went to the moon. Tomorrow marks the 40th anniversary of the July 16, 1969 launch of Apollo 11, with astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. “Buzz” Aldrin Jr. aboard. The entire trip lasted only 8 days, the time spent on the surface was less than one day, the entire time spent walking on the moon, a mere 2 1/2 hours – but they were surely historic hours. Below are a few of the 40 images that the Boston Globe blog “The Big Picture” has collected from this event and posted. They are amazing to reconsider.

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The Saturn V rocket lifts off on July 16th, 1969.

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On the surface of the Moon, astronaut Buzz Aldrin as photographed by Neil Armstrong (visible in reflection).

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Eagle approaches the Command Module during rendezvous after lifting off from the Moon.